Coriander is probably one of the first herbs to be used by mankind, perhaps going back as far back as 5000 BC. It is mentioned in early Sanskrit writings dating from about 1500 BC. The Romans spread it throughout Europe, and it was one of the first spices to arrive in America

Before it is used, Cilantro should be crushed, either by hand or with a mortar and pestle. Cilantro is a perfect addition to Mexican dishes; add Cilantro to salsas and bean dips.  Mix crushed Cilantro into sour cream and use it as a topping for chili, tacos, or enchiladas. Sprinkle Cilantro over stir-fried vegetables for color and Asian flavor. Add Cilantro to sesame-ginger dressing when making Chinese chicken salad

Cilantro contains no cholesterol; however, it is rich in antioxidants, essential oils, vitamins, and dietary
fiber, which help reduce LDL or "bad cholesterol" while increasing HDL or "good cholesterol" levels. It is a good source of minerals like potassium, calcium, manganese, iron, and magnesium. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps control heart rate and blood pressure. Iron is essential for red blood cell production. It is also rich in many vital vitamins, including folic-acid, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin-A, beta carotene, vitamin-C that is essential for optimum health. Vitamin-C is a powerful natural antioxidant. 100g of cilantro leaves provide 30% of daily recommended levels of vitamin-C.
Cilantro is one of the richest herbal sources for vitamin K; providing about 258% of DRI. Vitamin-K has a potential role in bone mass building by promoting osteotrophic activity in the bones. It also has established role in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease patients by limiting neuronal damage in their brain.
To see the full site that provides the rest of this information click here:
http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/cilantro.html
 

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